AD BC.

Though I haven’t yet written about anything prior or past the 17th or 18th Centuries AD I just want to make something clear about my reference to dates in Antiquity.

At some recent time, I don’t know when (ha ha), the traditional way of identifying time prior and post a certain date changed from BC and AD to BCE and CE (or sometimes ACE which I think you will all agree is a word not an abbreviation). Why I don’t know and frankly I don’t care, all that I care about is that you should know that were applicable, on this website all dates will be prefixed or postmarked Before Christ or Year of Our Lord (As the comment below says, After Death, is a popular memory hook, my thanks).

If you being fond of the newer appellations feel vexed about this then I’m sorry,  you will just have to go through the same irritation that I have to every time I read a book with your favoured distinction in it. Call me what you like, say,  your one of those guys who would wear a T shirt reading “When I was a Kid Pluto was a Planet” well I don’t have one of those shirts but it’s quite true nevertheless. Just as true as the fact that when I was a kid we used BC and AD and I like them.

Well having wasted enough of your time on my hang up, I’ll let you get on with your life. The author breaths out a long freeing sigh and relaxes.

Josh.

Kings Pirate: Henry Morgan’s Attack on Panama part 1

Recommended as Further Reading in Sir Henry Morgan by Don Nardo. 

Come on lets face it. We’re all suckers for a good Swashbuckler, corny or not, accurate or completely bonkers there is a huge soft spot for the daring do of the past. Give us a couple of big ships with allot of cannons, give us a jolly roger and a yo ho ho, give us cutlasses, rapiers and baggy shirts and you’re set for a good time.

I’m no different, as I have found that the real life adventures of these people were no less exciting or colourful. Indeed though in some parts those old fashioned pirate movies that people laugh at all the time, are sometimes closer to the truth than they are given credit for, I have never seen the reality to be a let down. So mateys, sign aboard my good ship and lets set sail with the greatest Buccaneer ever to lift a bottle of rum (a thing he did so frequently there’s even a brand named after him), a man who would have sent all the varying Hollywood pirates scurrying for their mamma’s – the notorious Welsh admiral of the brethren of the coast, Sir Henry Morgan. Following him to the fabled city of Panama in what was to prove the last of the Great Buccaneer raids, and what would prove one of the inspirations for the Golden Age of Piracy, Arrrrrr (Or whatever). Continue reading “Kings Pirate: Henry Morgan’s Attack on Panama part 1”

Wellingtons Decanters.

Now that I have this site I have the perfect excuse to bug all you nice people about the things that bug me. The Daily Mail recently ran a short article on a historical discovery made on the Antiques Roadshow. See link for article. I’m sorry I couldn’t think of a more ingenious name but let’s face it, there’s not much to work with.

Continue reading “Wellingtons Decanters.”

Masters of Battle: Elizabeth Butler Part 1.

Two of my great interests are history and art so to me it is very natural that history painting should form the basis of a section in this blog. They both complement each other nicely I think, so I have decided to put together a series about the great masters of battle. Not generals or admirals, though from time to time they do play a part but artists, whose sword is a paintbrush and whose order of battle is a palette, there armies are colours and there genius was their imagination. Stirring isn’t it, well I thought so. Ever since I started hearing about these great painters I wanted to see their works, thanks to the internet I have been able to do so, but seeing their pictures fuelled a desire to know more about the people who created them, so here they are, “TA DAH!” Or as much as I could find out about them anyway, the masters of battle and we begin with perhaps the most unusual because she was almost one of a kind. Overlooking grammer and spelling is always appretiated and with a bit of luck I’ll see you on the other side. Continue reading “Masters of Battle: Elizabeth Butler Part 1.”

Wellington in India.

The rise of the Duke of Wellington is a fascinating story. Despite his dogged reputation as a disciplinarian and a defensive fighter, his early campaigns can stand easily beside those of his great adversary Napoleon. Many admire the rise of the future Emperor for its daring and audacious accomplishments such as the crossing the Alps, Marengo and Egypt. There in Napoleon’s customary melodramatic flair appears to be the all the dash and action of a heroic novel, but then that is how he wanted it to look, and the French People soaked it in. Not as many people realise just how different Wellington was as a general and a man when he was in India. It is a glimpse into the general he might have been if he had not been so tightly curtailed by the government, what he might have been like if he had Napoleon’s freedom. So here it is, the first part of my series of Wellington in India, no doubt it will grip you, no doubt it will shock you, no doubt it will change your whole outlook on history, no doubt it will cure your insomnia and leave you sleeping like a kitten. Hope you enjoy it, please forgive spelling errors and grammer, and I’ll see you at the end. Continue reading “Wellington in India.”

C’est moi.

Allow me to enlighten those of you who wish to know a little more about the mysterious writer behind this blog. First off, despite the title of this post I cannot speak French beyond ordering food and a few phrases I have picked up from history books. Now to the point shall we? After a long think of a few minutes I have come to the resolution that I cannot call myself a Historian, for the very good reason that nobody calls me that. If I had to give myself a title for semi academic purposes I would call myself a Historical Observer. Or perhaps Commentator, would be a good word, or better yet a melage of the two… What is a Historical Commentator/Observer? Well don’t ask me, I just invented it, but it seems quite self explanatory, I observe history and give my opinions about it (see its like a historian but not). Well that about covers it. True I may have sown more confusion than enlightenment but then I never promised not to do so, but hopefully this has given a certain reson dêtre (There’s that deceiveingly authoritative use of French again) for what I do here.

Twitter Banners.

You sharp eyed visitors have probably noticed the stunningly awesome banners that are at the top of the page. It’s good that you have for a number of reasons. First because it proves that you can see, which can only enhance your experience here and second because they are rather eye catching, so the poor minimum wage freelance that I cajoled into doing them will be feeling very chuffed right now (well done, the pride of a job well done is yours). To the point then, they represent historical twitter accounts, that with the permission of the various Kings and Dukes and whoever else might appear in the future, have consented to appear here for publicity reasons and a very small yet substantial monetary donation. Right so now that’s out of the way please carry on to wherever you were going before this post distracted you.

Hello There!

Hello. Welcome to Adventures in Historyland. A rather informal place were I can annoy you with my thoughts about history. I tend to write allot about military subjects but as Lady Butler said not “For the glory of war… But for its pathos and heroism” and it isn’t all going to be soldiers and fighting. For more information and a better orientation please go to the About page. But I’d like to take this opportunity to say how nice it is to see you and if I may be so bold how nice you look today.